Rate of Inactivation of Isoniazid in South Indian Patients with Pulmonary Tuberculosis 2. Clinical Implications in the Treatment of Pulmonary Tuberculosis with Isoniazid either Alone or in Combination with PAS

Selkon, J B and Fox, Wallace and Gangadharam, P R J and Ramachandran, K and Ramakrishnan, C V and Velu, S (1961) Rate of Inactivation of Isoniazid in South Indian Patients with Pulmonary Tuberculosis 2. Clinical Implications in the Treatment of Pulmonary Tuberculosis with Isoniazid either Alone or in Combination with PAS. Bulletin of the World Health Organization, 25 (6). pp. 779-792. ISSN 0042 9686

[img]
Preview
PDF
RP196113.pdf - Published Version

Download (178kB)
Official URL: http://www.doaj.org/doaj?func=search&template=&uiL...

Abstract

A series of studies on the rate of inactivation of isoniazid in Indian patients with pulmonary tuberculosis undergoing domiciliary chemotherapy with isoniazid, alone or in combination with p-aminosalicylic acid, has recently been undertaken by the Tuberculosis Chemotherapy Centre, Madras. In the first study, the serum isoniazid levels of the patients were determined four-and-a-half hours after intramuscular administration of a standard dose of 3 mg/kg body-weight of isoniazid and, according to whether the serum level was 0.58 μg/ml or above, or less than 0.58 μg/ml, the patient was classified as a slow or as a rapid inactivator. The present paper describes the second of these studies, in which the response to treatment of the slow and the rapid inactivators was compared. The results of this investigation suggested that there might be an association between response to treatment and rate of inactivation of isoniazid, since the slow inactivators were more often culturenegative during treatment and showed a higher proportion of individuals with bacteriologically quiescent disease at I2 months and a lower proportion with radiographic deterioration at six months than the rapid inactivators, while the slow inactivators who deteriorated radiographically or clinically to an extent warranting a change of treatment during the two years did so later than the corresponding rapid inactivators. There was slight evidence that the slow and the rapid inactivators differed in the speed of conversion to bacteriological negativity of those patients whose disease was bacteriologically quiescent at 12 months, but no evidence that they differed in the degree of positivity of sputum specimens that were positive on culture at six, nine or 12 months, or in the frequency with which the patients showed moderate or greater radiographic improvement at six months.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: Tuberculosis > Operational Research
Divisions: Epideimology
Depositing User: Rathinasabapati R
Date Deposited: 15 Jul 2013 11:11
Last Modified: 08 Mar 2016 04:32
URI: http://eprints.nirt.res.in/id/eprint/36

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item