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Differentiation of highly prevalent IS6110 single-copy strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from a rural community in South India with an ongoing DOTS programme

Das, Sulochana D and Narayanan, Sujatha and Hari, Lalitha and Hoti, S L and Thangathurai, R K and Charles, Niruparani and Jaggarajamma, K and Narayanan, P R (2005) Differentiation of highly prevalent IS6110 single-copy strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from a rural community in South India with an ongoing DOTS programme. Infection, Genetics and Evolution, 5 (1). pp. 67-77. ISSN Print: 1567-1348; Online: 1567-7257

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Abstract

We have prospectively analysed the DNA fingerprinting of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains in a rural community from high prevalence area in South India with an ongoing DOTS programme. Strains from 451 culture-positive cases, diagnosed during July 1999–December 2000, were fingerprinted initially by both IS6110 and DR probes followed by polymorphic GC-rich repeat sequences (PGRS) typing only on lowcopy strains. The results were correlated with selected epidemiological and clinical data. Forty one percent of strains showed single copy of IS6110, which further got differentiated into 62 DR and 27 PGRS patterns. One predominant DR pattern (5B/2) was found in 20% of the lowcopy strains and was also involved in clusters. In all, 183 patients out of 451 (40%) were clustered in total 44 clusters when analysed by IS6110 and DR probes. With additional PGRS typing, the number of patients clustered was further reduced to 106 (23%). More number of patients (131) were clustered in IS6110 single-copy group. The maximum number of clusters was found with two or three patients. Only a small percentage (16%) of the patients reported direct epidemiological links while remaining patients might have had indirect links or casual contacts. Thus, a combination of two to three genetic markers is able to differentiate the most endemic strains of M. tuberculosis in areas with a high incidence of tuberculosis. The epidemiological data do not suggest any major outbreaks or a hot-spot hypothesis of transmission in this region. Phylogenetic analysis using IS6110, DR and PGRS RFLP (restriction fragment length polymorphism, RFLP) fingerprints showed that isolates exhibited clonal evolutionary pattern. The predominance of certain genotypes and agreement between the phylogenetic trees indicated that these strains were closely related and might have evolved or propagated from the common ancestor.

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Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: RFLP; Mycobacterium tuberculosis; IS6110 single copy; Clonal evolution; DOTS
Subjects: Tuberculosis > Laboratory Research > Immunological
Divisions: Basic Science Research > Immunology
Depositing User: Dr. Rathinasabapati R
Date Deposited: 29 Nov 2013 05:22
Last Modified: 09 Mar 2016 07:02
URI: http://eprints.nirt.res.in/id/eprint/727

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